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Notes for Relays

Attention to Relays

 

GENERAL APPLICATION GUIDELINES

 

1.

Avoid Abuse

As with any electro-mechanical device, relays are

sensitive to abuse. To assure optimum performance,

avoid dropping, hitting, or other unnecessary shocks

to the relay.

 

2.

Never Remove the Case

The case of a relay is an integral part of that relay.

NextGen Components relays are not designed to

have the case detached. Never remove the case,

as specifications or performance cannot be

guaranteed.

 

3.

Atmospheric Considerations

NextGen Components recommends that you use

unsealed relays only in an atmosphere with a

minimum of dust and other contaminants.

If a relay must withstand a harsh atmosphere,

we recommends that you utilize a sealed relay.

 

4.

Warning—Silicone Based Resins

Some silicone based resins can cause contact

failure in a relay. The silicone based resindoes

not need to come in direct contact to cause

damage it just needs to be in close proximity.

In cases where silicone based resins are used,

it is recommended that a sealed relay be used.

 

5.

Polarity

With polarized relays caution must be exercised,

as failure to use the correct coil polarity can cause

the relay to not operate. Always refer to the wiring

diagram in the mechanical specifications for the

correct connection.

 

6.

Voltage

To assure meeting the electrical and performance

characteristics, only the correct rated voltage should

be applied to the coil, i.e., voltage sine waves only

for AC coils,rectangular for DC coils.

 

7.

Over-Voltage

Although typically a spike will not effect a relay’s

performance, the voltage on the coil should not

continuously exceed the maximum allowable voltage.

 

8.

Contact Current

Currents that exceed the designated values should

be avoided.

 

9.

Check Your Load and Conditions

The specifications provided in this catalog are

“typical” specifications and are given only as

guidelines. The performance of contacts vary

depending on both the type of load and operating

conditions encountered. Please consider your

specific load and operating conditions in selecting

the optimum relay for your application.

 

10.

Warning—Ambient Temperature

The ambient temperature ranges, listed in the general

specifications for each relay, must be followed to

assure proper operation.

Note: Both the storage and operating range differs for

the sensitive and standard version of the same model.

Refer to the data sheet of the relay for specific

information.

 

11.

Ultrasonic Cleaning

Never use any type of ultrasonic cleaning. Ultrasonic

cleaning is always traumatic and is not

recommended.

 

12.

Relay Operating Temperature

The relay operating temperature varies with

ambient temperature, coil power dissipation, and

contact dissipation.

 

13.

Pickup and Dropout Voltages

Both pickup and dropout voltages should be

considered when selecting a relay coil voltage. 

 

14.

Power Relays

When using power relays, avoid the use of single

diode coil suppression. Use a zener and diode or

a capacitor and resistor instead for

longer contact life. Also, avoid storing relays in

excessively humid conditions as moisture can

affect performance in some cases.

 

GUIDELINES FOR RELAY HANDLING

 

NextGen Components utilizes extensive quality

control measures and takes extreme care in

packaging to assure that the relays you

receive are in the best possible operating condition.

Once they enter your facility, some common sense

care can prevent damage during handling. Some

areas to closely monitor and supervise include:

 

1.

Handling

Avoid handling relay terminals. Oils and contaminates

common to the human hand can cause

contamination of the surface finish which in turn can

lead to solderability problems.

1)

Always store relays at recommended temperatures.

Observe maximum storage temperatures listed in the

general specifications section of the data sheet for

your specific relay.

2)

Avoid misalignment of the terminal layout and P.C.

board hole pattern. Even if there is just a slight

misalignment, forcing a relay into the  board can

cause relay damage compromising such important

factors as seal integrity, relay performance, andrelay

reliability.

3)

Always store and handle relays in a clean 

environment.Your relays are state-of-the-art,

electromechanical components

and should be stored and handled as such. Even

environmentally sealed relays have exposed

terminals that are subject to contamination and

therefore are minimally sensitive to their

storage and production environment.

 

2.

Mounting

1)

Suggested PC board layout.

Refer to the PC board layout located on the data

sheet for your specific relay.

2)

For automatic insertion.

NextGen Components relays are available packaged

for a variety of automatic insertion machines. 

3)

Never bend terminals.

Once relay terminals are bent performance can no

longer be guaranteed. Never bend terminals to make

them self-clinching and avoid bending them to fit

misaligned holes.

 

3.

Flux Application

1)

Examine your procedure.

To assure minimum production trauma, thoroughly

examine the fluxing procedure for the specific relay

you are using. If the relay you have selected is not

sealed, be particularly careful as unsealed relays

are more susceptible to internal flux contamination,

resulting in compromised performance and reliability.

2)

Use rosin-based non-corrosive flux.

This type of flux has been extensively tested and

is the least hostile to the materials common to relays. 

3)

Don’t overflow the board.

Adjust the PC board’s position so that the flux

doesn’t overflow the top of the board. This is

especially critical for unsealed relays as they are 

susceptible to contamination due to overflow flux.

4)

Avoid flux sponge method.

Utilizing a flux sponge is not recommended. Often

the  downward pressure exerted on the relay and

sponge is enough to force the flux  into unsealed

relays causing compromised integrity.

 

4.

Preheating

1)

Always preheat.

Where possible, Picker Components recommends

that you always preheat relays prior to fluxing and

soldering, as preheating promotes better soldering.

For unsealed relays preheating also helps prevent

the penetration of flux into the relay during fluxing

and soldering.

2)

Recommended temperature and time.

Recommended temperature and time for preheat is

100°C (212°F) or less for a duration of approximately

1 minute.

3)

Don’t overheat.

Do not expose relays to high temperatures for long

periods of time as it may affect relay characteristics.

 

5.

Automatic Soldering

1)

Review Process.

Like fluxing, automatic soldering can be traumatic to

an unsealed relay. Always thoroughly review your

soldering procedure in light of the relay you are

utilizing, and check the thermal profile of the

process with NextGen Components’ Sales Rep.

2)

Optimum method.

The recommended method for automatic soldering is

flow soldering. Always adjust the level of solder so

that it does not overflow thePCB.

3)

Suggested automatic soldering temperature.

Unless otherwise specified, a solder temperature of

260°C  is recommended.

4)

Suggested automatic soldering time.

Unless otherwise specified, a time period of

approximately 5 seconds is recommended.

 

6.

Hand Soldering

1)

Soldering iron care.

Always keep the tip of your soldering iron clean as

contaminants on the iron can easily be transferred to

the solder and inhibit conductivity.

2)

Suggested hand soldering iron wattage.

Suggested wattage range for your relay soldering iron

is 30–60W.

3)

Suggested hand soldering temperature.

Unless otherwise specified, the suggested soldering

temperature is approximately 260°C

4)

Suggested hand soldering duration.

Unless otherwise specified, the suggested soldering

duration should be approximately 3 seconds.

 

7.

Relay Cooling

1)

Air cooling.

Prompt air cooling is recommended as it prevents

deterioration of the relay due to soldering heat.

2)

Cold liquids.

Although it is safe to totally immerse an

environmentally sealed relay, it is better to avoid 

immersing a relay into cold liquids immediately 

after soldering.

 

8.

Cleaning

1)

Sealed relays.

Sealed relays can be safely cleaned by immersion.

Select a suitable solvent by referring to the

cleaning solvent compatibility chart. 

2)

Avoid ultrasonic cleaning.

Ultrasonic cleaning on relays may cause problems

such as breaks in the coil or slight sticking of the

contacts.

3)

Unsealed relays.

Never clean unsealed relays by immersion.

4)

Relays with a removable tab.

Relays with a removable tab should be vented

(if desired) after cooling to room temperature

following cleaning and drying.

 

9.

Coating

1)

Unsealed relays.

Never coat dust-cover or just flux resistant relays.

Coating can penetrate the relay and in some cases

cause contact failure. If board coating is required,

mount the relay after coating.

2)

Flexibility.

Carefully check the flexibility specifications of the

coating material you are planning to utilize because

a coating that lacks the proper flexibility may peel

off from thermal stress.

3)

Coating selection.

Some coating materials may have an adverse

affect on certain types of relays. Select coating

materials carefully and check the Coating/Relay

Suitability chart. 

 

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NextGen Components, Inc.

13700 Alton Parkway, Suite 154,
Irvine,CA92618, USA
(949) 302 7493
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